Tennis Training: Enhancing On-court Performance

By Mark Kovacs, Ph.D.; W. Britt Chandler, MS; T. Jeff Chandler, Ed.D.

CONTENTS

Chapter 1. Importance of Training

Chapter 2. Principles of Developing Training Programs

Introduction
Adaptation
Loading
Specificity
Intensity
Volume
Frequency
Density
Individuality
Recovery
Variety
Specialization
Planning
Summary
References

Chapter 3. Energy Sources For Tennis Programs

Introduction
Energy Systems
—The Phosphagen System
—The Glycolytic System
—The Oxidative System
Efficiency of the Energy Producing Pathways
Oxygen Consumption
Metabolic Specificity
Energy Systems & Tennis
Tennis-Specific Energy Metabolism
Fatigue & Performance
Summary
References

Chapter 4. Nutrition & Hydration for Optimum Tennis Performance

Introduction
Four Major Dietary Goals
Basic Nutritional Background
Essential Nutrients
—Protein
—Fats
—Carbohydrates
Athlete Guidelines
—Glycemic Index
—Alcohol
—Vitamins and Minerals
When & How to Eat
—Pre-practice/Competition Nutrition
— 45 Minutes Pre-training & Competition
—During Practice/Competition
—How Much Is too Much?
—Timing of Carbohydrates during Play
Nutritional Recovery From Tennis
Hydration
—Don't Rely on Thirst as a Measure of Hydration
—Sweating, Electrolyte Balance, & Muscle Cramping
—Hyponatremia
—Structured Hydration Program
Ergogenic Aids
—Caffeine
—Creatine
—Antioxidants
—Ephedra
—Erythropoietin (EPO)
—HMB
—Anabolic Steroids
—Nicotine
—Glutamine
References

Chapter 5. Flexibility Training and Tennis Performance

Introduction
Definitions and Background
Timing
Warm-up
Static Stretching and Injury Prevention
—More Positive Warm-up Routines
Post-play
Shoulder & Upperbody Demands of Tennis
Dynamic Stabilizers
—Rotator Cuff Muscles
Shoulder Performance
Shoulder Injury
—The Elbow and The Tennis Shoulder
Lower Back/Core/Hips
Summary & Practical Application
References

Chapter 6. Flexibility, Warm-up, and Cool-down Programs for Tennis

Introduction
Dynamic Flexibility Warm-up Exercises
Junior Dynamic Warm-up
National/Collegiate Junior Warm-up
Flexibility Exercises
—Calf stretch
—Glute Stretch
—Standing Hamstring Stretch
—Standing Hip flexor Stretch
—Single Leg Lower Body Stretch
—Two Leg Lower Body Stretch
—Scorpion Stretch
—Shoulder Stretch
—Posterior Shoulder Stretch
—Sit and Reach
—Groin Stretch
—Pec Stretch
—Tricep Stretch
— 1-Leg Walking Opposite
—Walking Quad Stretch
—A-Skip
—Gambetta Lunge
—Hamstring March
—Heel Walk
—Toe Walk
—Hamstring Handwalk ("Inchworm")
—Knee-to-Chest Walk
—Lateral Lunge
—Walking Lunge
—Lunge with Rotation
Time Suggestions for Flexibility in Daily Programs
Hurdle Mobility Exercises

Chapter 7. Resistance Training and Tennis Performance

Introduction
Adaptations to Resistance Training
Muscle Fiber Types
Types of Muscular Contractions
Needs Analysis
Muscle Groups Used
—Forehand
—Backhand
Movements Used
—Movement Speeds
Training Variables
—Volume
—Intensity
—Frequency
—Choice of Exercise
—Tempo
—Rest
—Exercise Order
Motions of Resistance Exercises
Methods of Training
—Single-Joint vs. Multiple-Joint
—Multi-planar Exercises
—Free Weights
—Machines
—Body Weight
—Elastic Tubing
Standard Training vs Functional Training
Daily Program Design
—Full Body Routine
—Upper Body/Lower Body Split Routine
Training Goals
—Strength
—Hypertrophy
—Power
—Muscular Endurance
Summary
References

Chapter 8. Resistance Training Programs for Tennis

Introduction
Plyometric Exercises
—Standing Long Jump
—Squat Jump
—Barrier Jump
—Lunge Jump
Medicine Ball Exercises
—Chest Pass
—Overhead Toss
—Forehand and Backhand Throws
—Underhand Toss
—Push Press
Olympic Exercises
—Clean
—Snatch
Machines
—Chest Press
—Seated Row
—Overhead Press
—Lat Pulls
—Leg Curls
—Leg Extension
—Leg Press
Free Weights
—Bench Press
—Overhead Press
—Bent Row
—Upright Row
—Dumbbell Fly
—Pull Over
—Cable Row
—Front Shoulder Raise
—Side Shoulder Raise
—Step Up
—Romanian Dead LIft (RDL)
—Squats
—Lunges
—Squat Press
—Squat Pull
—Back hyperextension
Resistance Band Exercises
—External Rotation
Core Exercises
—Bench Sit-up
—V-up
—Hip Crossover
—Bicycle Crunch
Sample Training Programs

Chapter 9. Cardiorespiratory Endurance and Tennis Performance

Introduction
Cardiorespiratory Fitness Defined
Adaptations to Cardiovascular Training
—VO2
—Heart Rate
—Stroke Volume
—Cardiac Output
—Respiratory Adaptations to Training
—Blood Volume Adaptations to Training
Tennis Specificity and Cardiorespiratory Training
—Work/Rest Intervals
—Heart Rate and Tennis
—VO2 and Tennis
—Blood Lactate
Potential Pitfalls of Cardiorespiratory Endurance Training for Tennis
Cardio Training vs Short Interval Training
Summary
References

Chapter 10. Cardiorespiratory Fitness Programs for Tennis

Introduction
Junior Programs
National Junior Programs
Adult Programs

Chapter 11. Speed, Quickness and Agility

Introduction
Basic Science Behind the How and Why of Speed
—Reaction Time
Proprioceptors
What Should the Arms Be Doing during Tennis Movements?
What Happens When an Athlete Responds to an Opponent's Shot?
—Initiating Movement
—Impulse-Momentum Theorem
What Happens after the First Step into the Ground
—Acceleration
Using Shin & Trunk Angles to Improve Speed in Training
Phases of Each Step During Tennis Movement
—Phases of Each Sprint Cycle
Tennis-Specific Lateral and Multi-directional Movements
—Movement Techniques On Court
—Open Hip First Step
—Closed Hip First Step
—The Great Debate: Shuffle vs Cross-over Lateral Movements
—Recovery Movement
References

Chapter 12. Speed, Quickness, and Agility Drills

Introduction
Cone and Line Drills
—Slalom Cone Run
—Short X Drill
—Spider Drill
—Slow Gambetta Wheel Drill
—Alley Jumps
—D-line to T-line Drill
—Ball Drops
—Shadow Training
—Agility with Medicine Ball Throw
— 5-10-5 Tennis Variation
Stair Drills
—Two-Feet Stair Jump
—Stair Sprint Running
Resistance Running
—Resistance Running Forward
—Resistance Running Backward
—Resistance Running Lateral
Wall Drills
—Wall Drill Posture
—Wall Drill Drive-Up
—Wall Drill Drive-Down

Chapter 13. Training Progression: Linking Training to On-court Drills

Introduction
—Depth Jumps with Split Step to Groundstroke
—Medicine Ball Throws to Groundstrokes
—Medicine Ball Overhead Throws (Serving) to Volleys
—Fed Ball Drills Using Tennis-Specific Work/Rest Intervals
—Medicine Ball Points
—Slalom Cone Run with Groundstrokes
—Spider Drill with Groundstrokes
—Low Volley Drill
—Jump Squats to Serves

Chapter 14. Physical Testing for Tennis Performance

Introduction
—Reasons for Testing
—Goal Setting
Test Selection
—Anthropometric Testing
Body Fat Measures
BMI (Body Mass Index)
—BMI Calculation
—Girth Measures
—Skinfolds
BIA (Bioelectrical Impedance)
—BIA Pre-testing Guidelines
Hydrostatic Underwater Weighing
Bod Pod
Cardiorespiratory Endurance
—Shuttle Test
8 Speed and Agility
Agility and Speed Test
—Spider Test
Strength
Grip Strength
Power
—Vertical Jump
—Broad Jump
—Medicine Ball (MB) Throws for Power
Flexibility
Summary
References

Chapter 15. Periodization

Introduction
Major Components in Planning a Periodized Program
—Needs Analysis
—Cycles
—The General Preparatory Phase
—Specific Preparatory Phase
—Precompetition Phase
—Competitive Phase
—Peaking Phase
—Staired Progression
7 Areas To Periodize
— 1. Technical
— 2. Tactical
— 3. Physical
— 4. Psychological
— 5. Nutrition
— 6. Recovery
— 7. Academics
Age Concerns
The Focus Index
Sample Periodization Plan
References
Tennis Training ISBN 9780972275972, 0-9722759-7-5
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Book Specifications
Chapters 15
Pages 234
Cover Paperback
Size 6 × 9
ISBN 9780972275972